Marketing Operations Defined for Wikipedia, Part II

marketing operations meaningMarketing Operations definition as proposed updated content for Wikipedia, which would include the History of Marketing Operations. and Marketing Operations Defined for Wikipedia, Part I. Please comment below to indicate your approval/suggestions.

The 2014 Marketing Performance Management Study conducted by VisionEdge Marketing/ITSMA found that the role of Marketing Operations now includes the following:

  • Analytics and predictive modeling
  • Budgeting and planning; financial governance and reporting
  • Campaign analysis and reporting
  • Customer, market, competitive intelligence, research, and insights
  • Data management
  • Organization benchmarking & assessments
  • Performance measurement and reporting
  • Project management
  • Strategic planning
  • Talent and skills development
  • Technology & automation & pipeline management
  • Workflow process development and documentation

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Marketing Operations Defined for Wikipedia, Part I

marketing operations meaningMarketing Operations definition as proposed updated content for Wikipedia, which would include the History of Marketing Operations and Marketing Operations Defined for Wikipedia, Part II. Please comment below to indicate your approval/suggestions.

The marketing operations (MO) function has emerged due to the need for a more transparent, efficient, and accountable view of marketing. Its growth was initially driven by the proliferation of marketing technology and increased pressure from the C-suite to prove the value of marketing and contribute to the bottom-line. The purpose of marketing operations is to increase marketing efficiency and organizational agility. Agile marketing organizations are able to adapt their marketing efforts, quickly and successfully, in response to changing customer behavior, market conditions and business direction to the benefit of improved market share or customer value. … Read more →

Marketing Operations Summit Memoirs III

MarketingOps_SummitSilo-busting was the theme on the third day of the Marketing Operations & Technology Summit. Christine Crandell, CEO of New Business Strategies, is a renowned expert on marketing and sales alignment and she mesmerized the audience with profound insights about what it takes to collaborate and harmonize in the customers' and company's best interests. She pointed out several sources of distrust and drivers of misalignment. Some of the exciting insights included:

  • Customers do NOT want a relationship with a brand
  • Customers are religious about the experience they need: how can you help me get my outcome?!
  • Neither marketing or sales is inclined to talk about the outcome sought by customers, which is necessary in shifting their orientation to customers

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Marketing Operations Summit Memoirs II

MarketingOps_SummitThe liaison role of Marketing Operations was emphasized throughout the second day of the recent Marketing Operations & Technology Summit. Scott Brinker, renowned blogger of ChiefMarTech.com, brilliantly pointed out the dichotomies we face — left-brain or right-brain, top-down or bottom-up, centralized or distributed, intuition or analytics, inbound or outbound, and so forth — are actually false dichotomies. It's not a matter of either/or, but rather, integration of so-called opposites, and that's a necessity that Marketing Operations (MO) needs to embrace. The unicorn metaphor emphasized how hard it is to find people with the right mix of talent and experience to lead or liaison the false dichotomies.
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Marketing Operations Summit Memoirs I

Marketing operations professionals explored, learned, and celebrated together at the inaugural Marketing Operations & Technology Summit, held in San Diego in October 2014. From Wednesday afternoon through Friday at noon we experienced a wide variety of formats, activities, and topics — and everyone made lots of friends for continuation of the conversations. This is the first of a 3-part series highlighting this inaugural summit.
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The History of Marketing Operations

marketing ops historyWhere did the "Marketing Operations" (MO) field get its start? It all depends on how one defines MO. The term first drew attention in 2005 after analyst firm International Data Corporation identified the rise of the Marketing Operations function in its annual Tech Marketing Benchmarks study.

In August 2005 Gary M. Katz published Marketing Operations: Solving Marketing's Seven Deadly Sins on MarketingProfs. In November 2005, the Digital Asset Management and Marketing Operations Management Symposium in Los Angeles included a Marketing Operations Management track, created by Beth Weesner, Endaf Kerfoot and Kieron Osmotherly, and chaired by Gary Katz.

In June 2006, a standing-room-only crowd in Silicon Valley attended the Marketing Operations: How It Will Transform Marketing Forever roundtable, organized by Adrian C. Ott, chair of the Harvard Business School Association of Northern California. Panelists from Symantec, Cisco and BEA described best practices and how it worked in their organizations.

The first professional association focused on advancing practitioners and the field of Marketing Operations, the Marketing Operations Cross-Company Alliance (MOCCA), was established by Larissa DeCarlo of Hyperion, Chris Ewert of Adobe, and Mikel Irizar and Damon Moss of Symantec.

The first framework formally defining Marketing Operations as 5 Ts that support all of the marketing functions — total strategy, techniques and processes, tracking and predictive modeling, technology, and talent — was published by Adrian Ott in the Silicon Valley American Marketing Association's Thought Leadership publishing contest: The 5Ts of Marketing Operations.

Marketing Operations as a recognized professional discipline may indeed be less than a decade old, but the industry developments and scientific innovations in the marketing field that gave rise to MO go back nearly a century.

Following are some of the key advances and influencers that provided the roots of Marketing Operations as it is practiced today.
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How Intelligence-Minded is Your Marketing Organization?

intelligence-mindedBig data, predictive analytics, digital marketing, and the digital age are two-edged swords. They present exciting new capabilities in addition to myriad challenges in our capacity to derive their full potential. Being intelligence-minded is about reaping the full potential of your company’s intelligence. … Read more →

Why Are We Putting Up With Half-Brained Marketing?

Making the Most of Marketing Resources

right brain marketingHalf-brained marketing is obviously not a good thing. Yet, over-emphasis on left-brain or right-brain thinking, skills, or endeavors actually does plague many marketing departments.

Right-brain marketing prevails in companies that have historically valued advertising and marketing communications. Right-brain characteristics: qualitative, idea-driven, free-form, creative, intuiting, feeling, non-linear. Marketing has always been expected to use creative talent to tap into emotions and elicit responses from people, influencing their behavior.

Left-brain marketing is dominant in firms that have … Read more →

Effective Approaches to Reaping Intended Results in Marketing

marketing resultsMarketing ROI can be elusive. The results we intend to reap in a marketing effort are often dependent upon multiple players’ synergies. The mis-match in intentions and results is typically due to lack of strategic context, clear prioritization, and/or blinders.

  • Strategic Context: Sometimes best intentions are not adequately aligned with a strategic outcome. If a marketing effort isn’t resonating strategically with those you rely on, … Read more →

Marketing-Driven Business: Heaven or Hell?

marketing driven“Marketing-driven” sounds attractive. But then so does “market-driven”. And if you ask a project manager or accountant how they think the company should be driven, they’d say “project-driven” or “profit-driven”. Talk about blind-siding silos! So consider this: is “driven” about activity, or about direction? If you’re driven, you might speed down the highway with an unknown or misdirected destination and accomplish nothing. So it is, all too often, with “driven” as a mantra.

Marketing Hell
Driven implies a focus on activity without perhaps thinking through the long-term implications, lacking strategic direction and balance. When Marketing finds itself on a never-ending treadmill of tasks, or as a one-trick pony serving a single stakeholder … Read more →